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The Ghostly Message!
Twas at the stroke of midnight, Dec.31, 2007 when to my utter amazement, I was suddenly awakened from a deep sleep. My bedroom had been engulfed by a bright ghostly apparition. As I sat up in bed, I somehow summoned the courage and timidly asked my unwelcome visitor, “Who are you?” I was astonished when he announced he was Lieutenant Colonel White. I shook my head in total disbelief. Then, in a clear and commanding voice, he ordered me to be at Colonel White High School’s flag pole, promptly, at 11:55 p.m. The soldierly specter then added he would reveal a very important message that he wanted me to share with all Colonel White alumni. The entire day I was driven by an insatiable curiosity to hear what his message would be; so I decided I would leave my family’s New Year’s Eve party early and make the trip across town. I arrived at Colonel White a few minutes before the appointed hour, not knowing what would befall me. With a sudden burst of wind, Colonel White gracefully floated down to where I was standing. He instructed me to remain by the flag pole; but before I could utter a single word, he suddenly began to drift off towards the front entrance of the crumbling old building and soon disappeared from my view.

As I patiently awaited the return of the ghostly spirit, fireworks abruptly broke the silence of the tranquil evening, heralding in the New Year of 2008. All around me the neighborhood came alive with a joyful celebration. Even with all the noise distracting me, I heard a distinct sound that I thought was the pounding of a
sledgehammer echoing from inside the school.
My attention was now suddenly drawn to an eerie presence wafting out of the now lifeless building. The ghost of Colonel White reappeared, carrying a battered old
box, and sure enough a sledgehammer.

He saw the puzzled look on my face, and laughed. “Yes, I had buried this box in the very bowels of the school, even before the first brick was laid in 1927.” He then added “I need you as a witness, to testify to the box’s’ origin.” He placed the old box at my feet and asked me to return to Colonel White High School on Jan.12, 2008 and take some photographs for posterity. With a chuckle, he said, “I don’t show up in pictures very well.” I was instructed not to open the box until I entered the school.

Once inside he said “open it and you will find my message. Read it to all that will listen.” I dutifully returned Jan.12, - the day marked as the Final Farewell Ceremony to Colonel White High School.

After I had completed my picture taking task, I wandered through the halls reminiscing about my days at Colonel White High School. As I entered the cafeteria, a group of alumni came up to me and asked why I was carrying around that old box? I told them the story of how I had been visited by the ghost of none other than our very own Lieutenant Colonel White. All at once, a chorus of voices sang out “well aren’t you going to open the box and read the message?” Being equally curious myself, I eagerly pried open the lid and pulled out this old tattered document.

As I gently unfurled the paper, I began to slowly read what our

founder had written.

“One day this building will be torn down in the name of progress.” The building he writes, is just a physical reference point. “Do not be sad. My spirit was here when they were constructing it, and I will always be here at my post, in the future. I have heard every footstep and every voice that have echoed through these halls, even in the infamous tunnel. I have seen you struggle to make important decisions that will impact your life’s journey. I do not want you to forget your memories of C.W. - good or bad. That is part of the essence that has made you who you are today. It has helped you grow into a person of wonder and preserved in each of you a guiding vision.” Colonel White then added, “Remember, one of the greatest gifts is forgiveness, which frees your spirit and gives you serenity of the soul. Teach your children well, by passing on the principles and values that you learned while at Colonel White High School.” After listening to Colonel White’s message, one of my listeners suggested I should post this wondrous story on the CW 1964 web site for all to read. I promised them I would.

After the closing ceremonies had concluded, and all of the alumni had bid farewell, I made my way back to the flag pole. I was hoping for one last encounter with the ghost of Colonel White. As I stood by the flag pole, Lieutenant Colonel White appeared with a warm smile radiating from his weathered face. He said “Jim, when I hear laughter and fond memories being shared at reunions, and now being posted on the various Colonel White class web sites; that gives me a feeling of accomplishment and a deep sense of fulfillment!” He lastly added, “When it’s time to take down the tattered Grand Old Flag for the last time, I hope someone will take a moment to remember me, Lieutenant Colonel White and all I represented.” As his ghostly spirit began to slowly fade into darkening sky, I turned and gave him a final salute! I promised, I would always remember him and his prophetic message he gave to us all.

Take a few moments to reminisce about our “good old days” when times were much simpler and we were much younger. Journey back to the 50’s and 60’s as you check out the patchwork time collages. Each collage is a time capsule waiting to unlock our memories of an era long, long ago. Over the next few months, this CW Web page will showcase a number of time collages that I hope will trigger recollections from our youth. If these collages spark a funny or interesting anecdote, please write me your recollection and I will add it to this page.

 
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     The place for nostalgia. Remember When... Did we really do that 45 years ago?

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Click Here for the Military Hall of Fame

 

Construction began on September 1, 1927 and the building finally opened on May 28, 1929. Colonel White was officially dedicated on February 14, 1930 as an elementary and junior high school. The original complex contained 25 class rooms, a gym, and a study hall, a cafeteria, music room, Manual Arts and Home Economics Rooms plus an auditorium. In 1940 junior high schools were discontinued and Colonel White and Fairview were paired to become Fairview-White High School. Students attended Colonel White for their 9th and 10th grade years and completed their high school education for all 11th and 12th graders at Fairview.

In 1957 a new addition to the CW building permitted the school boundaries to be re-drawn, and Colonel White was transitioned into a four-year high school. As enrollment increased during the 1960’s more classroom space was added to house the growing student body. In 1968 another addition was added that wrapped around the front of the older building creating a look of a totally new building. The architect of the new building won an award for his new building design. However, this new addition eliminated the track and football practice field.

 

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Jerry Schultz highschool picture Jerry Schultz today

The Life and Times of Jerry Schultz

by Jackie Winkler

Jerry, as we called him in grade school, was always the nicest person, making those of us around him (at least the girls) laugh and think he "was the cutest thing" and such a nice guy. When I asked him to grace us with an interview, the following narrative will keep you reading! Jerry's take on things was written as though I could hear him talking to me personally... so I (Jackie Winkler) would like to introduce you to Dr. Jerome Schultz.

Born on May 7, 1946, Jerry Schultz, who was one of five kids, grew up on Catalpa Drive. Probably because of overcrowding at Jefferson, his kindergarten year was spent at a church close by to Ulrich's Drug Store. Jerry fondly remembers Jefferson Elementary School as being tons of fun. With his favorite subject being Art, Jerry tells about being in love with his Art Teacher, Letitia (Wehner?) (He always thought of her as Letitia, so he forgot her last name.) He was crushed when she got engaged to the Science Teacher. Jerry said all the kids were invited to her wedding and he remembers throwing rice. VERY HARD!

Fifth grade brought a new favorite. Although he says her name escapes him, Jerry remembers she laughed at his antics - like the time he was hiding behind a desk, dressed in a home-made costume of shredded rags along with Doug Deutch, who was in a safari hat, and they welcomed the class back from lunch with a lip-synched version of "I told the Witch Doctor." "Ooh-ee-oo-ah-ah." (Remember that one?) "Ting, tang, walla, walla, bing, bang!!" Such fun!

This was also a time when Jerry used to ride his bike everywhere. He spoke about the time when he, Evan Tarskey, and Doug Deutsch rode their bikes all the way out to the Fireworks Factory in West Dayton. Jerry said they were under-age and they paid some "Greaser Hood" to purchase their fireworks. The guy came out, gave them the goods, and they rode off, happy with the prospect of blowing up half the town. About a mile from the factory entrance, the punk stopped them and threatened to beat them to shreds if they didn't hand over the explosives - which being wimps, they did. That was a sad ride home!

It was 7th grade when things began to get ugly with the abuse that this fat boy, as Jerry called himself back then, started to suffer by some of the "cool" guys at Bar Mitzvah parties. He spoke about being held by his legs over the edge of the roof at the Miami Hotel. He says he holds no grudges though. He got even. He became a child psychologist.

Older Brother, Nathan was a Senior when Jerry was a Freshman and Jerry followed Nathan's footsteps into the band. In 1964, his Sister, Becky was a Junior and Jerry helped teach his "tone-deaf" Sis, how to sing on demand when the "mean girls" caught her in the halls, while she was pledging some High School Sorority. He helped keep Becky's "Blue Box" filled with goodies so she didn't get busted for not having gum etc.

During his sophomore or junior year, Jerry moved to Catalpa Woods (Heather Drive) which was Fairview territory - but it was too late - Colonel White H.S. had taken possession of his soul, and those Little Colonels had stolen his heart.

Younger Sister, Elaine, one year behind, started at Colonel White and then jumped ship to go to Fairview when the family moved. Sidney, a younger Brother and former owner of General Surplus, was a freshman when Jerry was a senior and did his whole sentence at Fairview. All Jerry's siblings are alive and well, which is kind of a miracle in itself.

While growing up, Jerry took piano and sax lessons; but never practiced enough. He was content to play second chair to Mark Karlsberg - Now that Karlsberg, he really practiced said Jerry! Playing in the Pep Band, Dance Band, (playing a big "honkin" baritone sax,) Orchestra, and Pit Orchestras in musicals were always at the top of his list and such a highlight. As to student directing the marching band at the half-time shows - a totally student-run enterprise, - Jerry referred to it as "grace under pressure for all." He said hands down, Jack Devilbis was his favorite high school teacher. The band and all the other forms of instrumental music in which he was involved, were among the most formative experiences of his life. Without Mr. D (and all that came with that i.e.: the discipline, the talent nurturing, the respect (mutual) and oh, yeah - those Little Colonels) - Jerry thinks he would have been such a looser!

While explaining about how well he did in school and how it began to affect his life, Jerry said he was absolutely horrible in Math and was in what must have been the remedial class (Mr. Plunkett.) That's when he learned what feeling really stupid felt like and he began to feel empathy for the kids he ended up working with and writing about. Fortunately he was good in English and loved to do creative writing. He remembers Mrs. Clippinger encouraging her students to sign on to work on a freighter at sea during one summer to "learn about the world." Jerry thought the idea cool and began to explore the possibility. His parents, however, didn't think it was so cool! His Father said, "I came over from Poland in steerage - lemme tell you, it was not that cool!" Feeling that most of his high school classmates had him pegged as a perennial buffoon and jokester, Jerry, loved being the center of attention (and still does.) He said many of us were his first audience and this helped to eventually prepare him for being comfortable in front of large groups. He told me he teaches a lot of people a lot of things and his "method" is "edutainment." It's a style that is rewarding and fun for both Jerry and his audience. However, Jerry did admit to having an embarrassing moment during a keynote presentation to nearly 1000 people,when he left his wireless microphone on while going to the bathroom during a break. He laughed and said, "need I say more?!!"

After graduating Colonel White, Jerry was OSU bound for his undergraduate work. OSU was within driving distance and tuition was $125 a quarter. He pledged Sigma Alpha Mu as a freshman, which had enforced study hours that he feels put him on track for academic success. In three years he became President of a house filled with 125 guys, many of whom were brilliant and talented; but others were right out of central casting for "Animal House." Jerry remembers wearing a jacket and tie while serving on the Dean's Council during the day and clearing the mail room of Pot at night. (The winter quarter was spent in Mexico by some of the guys.) The experiences and leadership training Jerry received while serving as president of his fraternity far outweighed the value of any single course or series or courses in undergraduate school. Much like band was in High School

During his junior year at Colonel White, Jerry met Marlene (Greenfield) from Fairview Class of 1966. Jerry was OSU bound and Marlene went to Miami at Oxford. After two years and a totaled car from the commute between both schools, Marlene transferred to OSU as well. She and Jerry were married right after Jerry finished at OSU in 1968 and he says the rest is beautiful history.

The Draft prevented Jerry from going directly to Graduate School, and he found a job as a Special Education Teacher in Westerville, Ohio. By night he finished his Master's Degree. When called up for the Draft, Jerry was told he had high blood pressure and his doctor confirmed his diagnosis. This kept him from being drafted, unlike so many of his brave classmates; but it allowed Jerry to begin a long life of service to his community. Jerry likes to think the Army saved his life.

Even though Jerry admits he did not do well in his first High School Psychology class, he feels the career seed was planted. He always had a love for little kids and says they are a terrific audience. He earned his Ph.D. at Boston College and was offered a job supervising Student Teachers. In his Ph.D program, Jerry did a two-semester course that put him on an interdisciplinary team at Children's Hospital in Boston. He got to work with all kinds of special needs and their families. He says he learned more there from some of the best minds and souls in the field, than in any course he had ever taken. Eventually, he joined the faculty as a junior member. He subsequently did two post-doctoral fellowships - one in clinical psychology and the other in clinical neuropsychology, a specialized field of assessment. In between, he became director of an LD clinic in Children's Hospital in Dayton and he and Marlene moved back, establishing their residence as "adults."

Jerry has been in private practice as a clinical neuropsychologist for many years, having taught at Wright State, Boston College, and Harvard Medical Schools. He directed three different clinics and is now a mental health consultant for several school districts. He tells me he enjoys a robust and rewarding career, traveling and speaking about his new book, entitled, "No where to Hide: Why Kids with ADHD and LD hate School and what we can do about it." It deals with the impact of stress in the lives and on the brains of kids with LD and ADHD.

Saying that his wife, Marlene (Greenfield) has always been his best advocate and supporter, Jerry says his professional life has been a series of wonderful adventures with each job leading to another more exciting one. Marlene is always on the lookout for fellowships and other learning opportunities. Her enthusiasm for Jerry's work (and her knowledge of it - she's a successful social worker and Jerry admits, has taught him much,) keeps him moving forward. Eventually the shingle for his private practice was hung. After about six months, the phone began to ring and hasn't stopped yet!

When asked where Jerry has worked, the list includes: Westerville Public Schools, Wright State University, Children's Hospital, Dayton, Boston College, Lesley University, Cambridge MA, Cambridge Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Private Practice, (Wellesley & Lexington MA.) But by and large, Jerry's most thrilling moment was getting married and being able to wake up every morning next to the only woman he has ever loved -besides Letitia Wehner. He is also proud of and was thrilled at seeing his two wonderful and talented daughters, Julie and Betsy come into the world. They are now married to their own "Mr. Rights" and Julie has two boys, while Betsy has three girls. The publishing of his book, above, was another shining moment in Jerry's life.

People have had some nice things to say about him over the years, for which Jerry is very grateful - but for him, the best thing has been the wonderful opportunity to work and learn from so many professionals, children and their families. Although he would never guessed it high school, his Jewish life has given him knowledge; a sense of community; and a venue for exploring his spiritual side. He has had the joy of watching his children, their husbands, and Grandchildren grow up with similar beliefs and values - which are especially important in this world where it's sometimes hard to find your center, your compass and your anchor.

Jerry wished so much he could have been at our 50th Reunion to re-connect with old friends and hear about their lives, their joys, their sorrows, as well as their dreams and hopes for the next three or four decades. He said he has so many memories of laughter and the fun times we had together so many years ago - and all those moments seem so very alive and vivid to him. We were so lucky, Jerry told me, to have grown up where and when we did - at a time and in a place that opened doors for so many of us. Some of the people we shared the halls with are no longer here, and that is indeed a very sad reminder or our vulnerability. But, if you are reading this, YOU are here - and Jerry wished he could see our smiling faces (and hopefully, our high school nametags!)



Nancy Jones Lands In Seattle Washington

We've FINALLY caught up with Nancy Jones, now Nancy Evans-Jones (Evans was her mother's maiden name, and she added that to hers)! She lives on the Kitsap Peninsula across the Sound from Seattle, Washington with husband Frank Mandt, their two cats and two dogs.

Nancy went to Kent State for a year after CW, but then caught mono and didn't return. "I worked for my dad for a while, got married in '70 and moved into a house on Marathon right behind Colonel White," she said.

While in Dayton, and later in Cincinnati, she got into the travel business and even had her own agency for a while. In '84, she divorced, and then met Frank and the two moved to the Seattle area, where they've stayed.

Unlike our recent weather, Nancy says "it hardly ever snows or freezes here - it's very temperate."

Once settled in the area, Nancy met someone in the Navy's Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, applied for a job as travel coordinator, got it, and worked as a Regional Travel Manager for 20 years.

"There are four Navy bases in the Seattle area, and did a lot of traveling." She's been to Japan, South America, Ecuador, Japan, and Europe - among other places - and even escorted tours to Australia and New Zealand.

Since retirement, she and Frank still enjoy travel, but not as often or to such exotic places; they recently went to the Canadian Rockies.

She and Frank started a Unitarian Universalist church near their home and are very active with that. She also spends her time walking the dogs, gardening, and reading. "We're voracious readers," she says.

To get to Seattle, they take a 30-minute ferry; the closest town is Kingston, and they built their house by a 20-acre beaver pond, where they often see bears, otters, deer and other wildlife. "We're both animal lovers."

Although Nancy doesn't get to Ohio often and doubts she'll make our 50th reunion, she enjoys reading the class website. "I peek in every month or so to see what's going on - it's very interesting."

She's still wondering about some of our classmates that haven't been located, and that's why it's so important for other "lost" members of the class of '64 - whether or not they plan to attend the reunion - to keep us informed.

I've wondered what happened to Nancy since our last contact when she was at Kent State, and, even though I probably won't see her at the reunion, it was wonderful to touch base with her again and catch up on her doings.

See Nancy's obituary in our "In Memoriam" Section.

 

Ginny Lake Burroughs

 

Catching-up with William “Bill” Wells!


By Jackie Winkler

Through an unexpected chain of events I reconnected with our classmate, Bill Wells. Not wanting to miss an opportunity, I found out that Bill was quite willing to complete the brief “Interview” we have been using with the other mini-biographies you’ve been reading on our web site. Once again I am awed at the great lives our classmates have lived since our high school days. Calculating the far-reaching contributions of our graduating class to our society is impossible. Keep reading to find out how Bill has spent the last 50 years of his life…

Bill was born in Dayton—as most of us—on May 7, 1946. He is the youngest among his siblings and was raised primarily by his father. He attended Trotwood-Madison Elementary for grades 1-5, Grace A. Greene for grade 6, Kemp Elementary and Grace A, Greene for 7th, and Johnsville-New Lebanon for 8th grade before heading to Colonel White. His favorite elementary teacher was Mrs. Jones (easy name to remember!). He esteems many of his high school teachers, but his favorite was Coach Eby. He appreciated Coach’s organization and discipline. Bill graduated 73rd in our class of 365 and affirms that CW prepared him well for college and life in general.

While growing up, Bill considered himself an “outdoor kid.” In the good ‘ole days, he played the games we all remember well: cowboys and Indians, Superman, Tarzan, Red Rover, and tag. His siblings and neighborhood friends were willing participants.

When trying to recollect some of the highs and lows of his school years, he remembered that he was expelled from 5th grade band for “disrupting” the class due to his ineptness in the music area. Disrupting any class in those days was cause for discipline. He discontinued trying to learn to play the coronet, but he still loves music. In fact, his love for music keeps him from giving up the desire to take ballroom dance lessons.

High school offered Bill a chance to shine. He was on the track and cross country teams along with wrestling and his personal high points were scored there. He was on the 1962 CW Wrestling Team that won the 1962 City Championship, and Bill contributed by placing second in his 127 pound weight class. It was his great pleasure to have Dick Scott as a teammate and role model and he was actually able to beat him occasionally! This team victory contributed to Bill’s ability to obtain a college track scholarship. During his CW days, Bill developed a close friendship with Ron (Ronnie) House; Ron was Bill’s other role model. He and Ron have maintained their friendship over the years, and they now live in the same city (Richmond, Kentucky) where Bill performs volunteer service in Ron’s business. Bill does the clerical and administrative duties that free Ron to do the selling and financial planning for his clients. Plus, he has the freedom to set his own hours…who wouldn’t like that! Their friendship has provided the kind of support we all need as we tread through life’s changes.

Following high school Bill attended Tennessee Technical University (TTU) for two years before joining the U. S. Air Force in 1966. He is one of our esteemed veterans of the Viet Nam war (he is named in our Military Hall of Fame). After he finished his Air Force enlistment, he resumed his college education at Eastern Kentucky University (EKU). He earned his Bachelor of Science in 1973 and his Master of Education in 1977. Knowing from a young age that he wanted a career in education for those with special needs, in college he focused on teaching special education courses (learning disorders and behavior disorders).

Even though he was initially concerned that he might not find a job in his career field, he was appointed as a Veteran’s Counselor for EKU. Following that successful endeavor he secured a 25-year career as a Rehabilitation Counselor for the Michigan Department of Education. Bill spent his entire career helping underprivileged men and women, military and civilian, find jobs, meaning for life, and a full range of other services. Special accomplishments include being track and cross-country team captain during his two years at TTU (1965 and ’66) and setting new school records in track. The Michigan Department of Education awarded him District Counselor of the Year in 2001. On the opposite end of the spectrum, his most embarrassing moment was when he walked into the women’s restroom in the Los Angeles International Airport…he and Rick Sykes have this in common!

Bill met his wife in Battle Creek, Michigan, and they were married in 1968. Sharing a great love for children, they adopted three daughters and were foster parents for many children during their 43 years of marriage. His wife, Penny, passed away in 2011. Even while managing his own health challenges, he faithfully cared for his wife until her time on earth was finished.

Bill reluctantly admits that his hobby is TV. He was so busy taking care of others during his marriage and career that he forgot to spend time on himself. His favorite food is meatloaf, and his favorite color is blue. Pets? He has two dogs and a cat that comes and goes! If he could live anywhere in the world—with no restrictions or hindrances—he would like to live in Hawaii. Bill has never traveled to Europe and would also like that experience. Again, he is looking for that gal who would enjoy taking dance lessons with him! Anyone want to accept that invitation?" He plans to join us at this coming October Night Out (October 6), so let’s all get-together!

 

Friends Last a Lifetime!
(Take a closer look at one of my best friends…)

By Jackie Winkler

E. J. Brown was only about a ten-minute walk from my house on Marcella Avenue. We moved to Marcella in time for the beginning of my 5th grade, and I was privileged to be assigned to Mrs. Dashiell’s class. Now, in those days we rarely, if ever, thought about our teachers’ having normal families, and the persona of Mrs. Dashiell didn’t disappoint. She was, of course, old (indicated by salt-and-pepper colored hair) as were all teachers in the day; she was astute and a no-nonsense teacher, but she possessed a softness that I appreciated. Her classroom was where I met Kristi…Kristen Ellen Baker Duckwall Manns Andreae.


Kristi and I became friends that year, setting the foundation by my stopping at her house on N. Main Street on the way to E. J. Brown. Her mother, especially, had a profound effect on my life and what I wanted to convey to my own children one day. I will always be grateful for Mrs. Duckwall’s influence. Anyway, Kristi and I remained good friends, together on the 8th grade cheerleading squad and through our days at CW and the comradery among Little Colonels. (We even commiserated with each other’s knee problems!)

Graduation came, and we each drifted into our own post high school channels and did not reconnect until Kristi moved to Yellow Springs, Ohio, to care for her aging mother. I couldn’t wait to visit Kristi!

After several email exchanges we (Doug Holdeman and I) finally were able to set a lunch date, so we headed for Kristi’s office…yes, her office.

Kristi was born in July 1946 in Dayton, spent the first few years of her life in Texas, and then moved back to Dayton where she and I met. Preferring to spend most of her time indoors, she followed on the heels of her beloved grandmother from whom she learned “how to cook, bake, sew, and make the most of whatever you had!” Her favorite elementary teacher was Ms. Banta; her favorite subject was English; her favorite CWHS teacher was Mr. Fullerton. During high school she marched with the Little Colonels for three years, served in Fidelis and on the Student Council.

Her younger brother, Mark, still resides in the Dayton area. She married and moved to Silver Springs, Maryland where she had her first son and spent 13 years with her first husband. She married her second husband and had another son and then added a daughter as a foster child, mentioning that she experienced all the trappings of raising a teenager! Kristi and her second husband who is now deceased were quite close, and she couldn’t be more proud of her two sons and her foster daughter!

Kristi has spent her life (including her start as a Candy Striper with me and a couple of other E. J. Brown friends) in the people-helping business. By age six she realized she wanted to be a nurse. As you can see from her business card, she is a Licensed Registered Nurse and a Certified Acupuncturist. In addition she is a Certified Massage Therapist. Kristi’s migration from one profession to another has equipped her with a wide and ever deepening knowledge and conviction that we are whole human beings who require a “wholeness” physically, mentally, and spiritually if we want to thrive.

When Kristi settled on her current practice as an acupuncturist, it was the result of having been an acupuncture patient, suffering greatly with rheumatoid arthritis. She enjoyed such success with her treatments that at age 33 she redirected and extended her training toward certification as an acupuncturist. She was adamant about the study of acupuncture being a lifelong endeavor—“so much to learn,” she says. Her formal studies include education both here and abroad. When asked about the current American medical community’s perspective regarding acupuncture, Kristi is quite encouraged. Right now, acupuncture is not recognized as a viable medical discipline, but she is hopeful that will change in our lifetime. Her schedule is full all week, every week which tells its own story.

With Kristi’s busy schedule she has had to narrow her focus as far as extracurricular activities and hobbies. Work, family, and friends consume her days especially since she is caring for her mother who is in the mid stage of Alzheimer’s disease. She did say that she and another of our classmates are taking ballroom dance lessons—not together—but at the same studio. (Do you remember Jack Layh? He is a PhD of Psychology who also lives and conducts his practice in Yellow Springs and is her dance partner!) She coaxed Doug and me to join them, but…

We thoroughly enjoyed our time with Kristi in the artsy town of Yellow Springs, but before leaving I wanted to know if this would be where she would stay indefinitely. Her response was, “definitely not Ohio,” and that she is actively researching where she wants to finally settle. If she could visit any place on earth, South America and Costa Rica. So if you want to embark on an interesting day trip—if you live in Ohio—make your destination Yellow Springs and give Kristi a call before she heads to other parts of the US! A familiar sight there: decorated trees.

    

 

The Chapters of My Life
By Dave Annis

     There would be many chapters to this article if constructed for meaningful events, - too many chapters to count if it were to include failures, successes, highs, and lows; and the ebb and flow of daily living. However, it is easiest to write and read if divided into three chapters based on locations: Dayton, the World, and Florida.

     Zero to eighteen were the Dayton years. Born to two of the most exceptional people who provided the best environment possible (love, acceptance, and individuality,) the sail was set. Out of doors allurement played havoc with indoor necessities. School was stifling and meaningless. If it had not been for the element of fun that was a constant companion, the rolls of high school dropouts would have grown by one. Caught in the current of early life; the ease of drifting along the merry way; savoring the benefits of having my needs met by others; the efforts of the next chapter, brought the ease of the first chapter to an abrupt halt.

     The World began after a miserable semester at Wright State University. Aptitude and attitude were ill equipped to tackle serious study. The escape valve was the Air Force. Looking back, it was the best move available. What began haphazardly, eventually brought marriage, family and stability within a twelve-year period. Between Viet Nam and Holland, marriage came quickly. Our first was born in the Netherland, another in California, and the third in New Hampshire. The world was our oyster.

     Education resurfaced its lovely head after the Air Force had exhausted it usefulness. Starting at the bottom at 32 is not an envious position by any stretch of the imagination. Hard work and sacrifice by all; and studying with earnest; eventually achieved a Bachelors and a Masters in six years, and a position on the faculty after four years. Education assumes vocation, and Tennessee was where it began.

     As pastor of a church in the Bible’s belt buckle, especially a new church, there are many exasperations and rewards. By the grace of God, and some good people who believed; a small church grew, a counseling practice thrived, the kids launched, and the next stage was set for the World.

     Nearing 50 years, this next step brought new life and death. Life’s leap landed in Russia. There to lead Russian educators how to teach. (This done by a student, who was told by a teacher, that a D or F level was to be the future.) The challenges were overwhelming and wonderful. Volumes could be written here alone with experiences and encounters with Misha, Nikita, Svetlana, and countless others; but space limits. The death happened slowly. Health suffered dramatically in Russia. Finally, it arrived in Florida. After 29 years the marriage died.

     Now, lack of vocational direction, and family stability, meant that three lonely and hard years were ahead. Haphazardly at first, better defined as time grew, a new life and wife unfolded. In Florida with a larger family (7 children and 17 grandchildren), a new vocation (investment counseling rather than marriage and family counseling), the richness of life overwhelms and humbles me.

     Are you thinking, who in the world is the serious, stuffy guy? Yes, it is the same old happy go lucky Dave Annis that you knew in the halls of Colonel White. I should say outside the hall of CW, as I really was not there that much in my junior and senior years. As the advertisement manager for the school paper, I had a “get out of school pass”. I made hooky into an art form, albeit not authorized by Mr. Davis. Colonel White honed my socializing skills, which are still in use today. To this day, I still wear the high impressions of esteem for Coaches Eby and Whittaker, and a few impressions held a little lower, planted there by our principal, Mr. Whitworth.

     As you can see, the course of my life has made some rather dramatic changes. From pupil to airman to pupil, to professor, to pastor and counselor, to consultant, and I have treasured them all. However, I especially treasure the course that life is now on, and I intend to see it through. Surrounded by water, a pool in the back yard; a lake in front, grandkids galore, gobs of friends, 3 house cats and a back yard filled with birds, my plants, a special someone who accepts me as I am, and my work where I will die at my desk, only a fool would ask for more.

     If I can distill my life into a three of meaning thoughts, they would be: Starting over only kills you for a little while. Then it releases you. Never give up on yourself. Dissimilar people shape you best. Don’t resist them, as there is much to learn. The best day of my life is today, and tomorrow will be better.

     Asked to supply pictures for this article, I would prefer that your use your mind. Picture me with the same amount of hair, (more salt and less pepper by the day), the same smile (all my teeth), and the same eyes (focused by trifocals). Remember that lithe body, well double it. Remember those swift legs, well hobble them. I walk like a penguin. Think of me as a closed coffin. “I prefer to remember him as he was“, trust me you do. And that is the way I prefer to remember you. Go Cougars Go!

    

 

What Has Dagmar Taudien Been Doing Since 1964?

By Jackie Winkler

     Once again it is my pleasure to have reconnected with a fellow classmate and Little Colonel! As soon as she received my request to send interview questions to her, she said she would be glad to participate. We always start at the beginning!

     Dagmar was born on November 16, 1946 in Germany near Hamburg. She is the only child born to her parents, and they all came to the USA when she was five years old. She attended E. J. Brown Elementary School. As a kid she was a nice mix of an outdoors kid and an indoors kid—she could entertain herself either place. Her favorite subjects were art, music, science, and English. Mrs. Banta (third-grade teacher) and Mrs. Stichweh (her fifth-grade teacher) were her favorite grade school teachers. Of Mrs. Banta, Dagmar says this:

     “She was so very nice to all children, and most of all, let us help and cure
injured pigeons and other animals that we found. She let me keep the class
pigeon at home over Christmas J!”

Of Mrs. Stichweh, she shares this:

     “…who helped our family integrate into American society in Dayton when there was still much anti-German sentiment.”

     Transitioning from Brown School to Colonel White High School, she found a life-long friend in Mrs. [Martha] Cole who taught Spanish. She gravitated to Mrs. Cole because she was “super nice, incredibly committed to Colonel White and the students in all clubs she lead, no-nonsense, sympathetic, humorous, and passionate about Spanish language and Hispanic culture.” They kept in touch until Mrs. Cole passed away. In a different manner, she appreciated Mrs. Treue in English because “although frustrated, she was ultimately OK with all of the crazy things we did to her in her classes.”

     When I asked Dagmar what her major high school activities were, she answered, “You’re kidding, right? Of course, it was the Little Colonels!”

     Dagmar was selected as a Little Colonel during the spring of her freshman year, and her senior year she marched as an officer: Drill Captain!

     “The Little Colonels affected my life in a huge way. When I entered Colonel
White HS I was very frightened and shy. Making the team made me proud,
but I still didn’t believe that I could possibly belong. Mr. DeVelbiss was the
person who made my life worth living (at that vulnerable teenage time). Through
his kindness as well as strictness toward all, equally, and love for his band
and marching group, I found friends, companionship and a way out of my shell.”

     “You got a D in Algebra? And so you are on probation from the Little Colonels??? You can’t march in the next game?” said my dad. “Well I got through that crisis, and I learned how to avoid math for the rest of my career.” Additional CWHS extracurricular activities included American Field Service, Spanish Club, Senior Y-Teens, and Ducemus.

     Not having a clue herself what she wanted to do after high school, she admits her classmates couldn’t have known either. She wanted to travel to foreign countries, and she liked foreign languages. She graduated from Wright State University with a Bachelor of Arts, from the University of Wisconsin, Madison with a Master of Arts, and completed all but her dissertation for her doctorate from Indiana University, Bloomington. By the time she was a senior at Wright State, she knew that foreign languages were her destiny. She also realized that handling a high school classroom would not be her forte. So, loving the theater, she concluded that nothing would suit her better than teaching college and performing every day!

     Her teaching career focused on Spanish and secondarily German. When she applied for an instructor position at 75 colleges, over 50 other applicants also posted for the position. Not wanting ever to live or work in Ohio but rather in a place with beautiful mountains and water—her first job was instructor of German and Spanish at Denison University in Granville, Ohio! Others jobs she held were Director of an academic program in Spain for the Experiment in International Living, Spanish instructor at Austin College, Texas, and now, Senior Lecturer in Spanish at the University of Toledo, Ohio…did she say she never wanted to live and work in Ohio?

     Through her contacts with students, she and her husband have taken a group of students to Toledo, Spain for the last 11 years. They complete an academic, 4-week program there at the Universidad Castilla La Mancha.

     She is exceptionally proud of having received an award three times for being Advisor of one of the top 10 chapters of Sigma Delta Pi, the National Spanish Honor Society. The competition includes 450 chapters nationally, which makes the award quite prestigious. Other honors include several teaching awards and local photography awards.

     All of the organizations she has been involved with over the years at various levels are community builders. She has been a long time board member of The Association of Two Toledos, (first Sister City in the world, 1931--Toledo, Spain and Toledo, Ohio), Advisor of The National Spanish College Honor Society that is active in Hispanic events, Toledo Friends of Photography, and other community organizations. She was also very involved with her sons’ school PTA boards, sports, and Scouts. She credits Mr. DeVelbiss and the Little Colonels with establishing the mindset and example of getting involved and helping others…”Thank you, Mr. DeVelbiss, for training us for the future (without wearing our uniforms when soliciting money J!”)

     Dagmar has had so many thrilling moments that she admits it’s difficult to name just one. However, she decided to go with the most recent one: standing on top of the ruins of Macchu Pichu, the Inca Ruins in Peru. She continues, “It would be so incredible to soar through the skies over this part of the world without a motor, just with the wind flying through your wings. Life on Earth is amazing!”

     Taking us into her more personal life, she tells of meeting her husband, Anthony “Tony,” when they shared a teaching assistant office in the Department of Foreign Languages at IU in Bloomington in 1974. He is from San Francisco, and this year (2010) they celebrated their 34th anniversary. Tony has been Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages at the University of Toledo for the past 8 years AND her boss—a tricky situation! They have two sons, a rescued “American Eskimo dog”, i.e. German Spitz, red, not white, with some blue spots on its tongue, probably a Chow mix!

     Reading, photography, a little gardening, piano, and feeding the birds and squirrels rank among her hobbies. She loves just about any dish from Spain (meaning food, not the dish itself), but mostly a fancy Spanish dish her son makes when he visits from Washington U (St. Louis) where he’s a graduate student in German! She loves all shades of green, so the next time you buy a present for Dagmar, make it green!

     Finally, words that Dagmar’s best friend would use to describe her: Crazy, always late, always gets everyone to dance, politically engaged, environmentalist. So there you have it! All about Dagmar…if you ever try to find her and can’t, look in La Coruña, Spain amidst the cultural night life or in India studying their culture and history.

"I want to go back to high school" by Jackie Winkler

 
     I am realizing more and more how much I missed—how much I missed not really knowing my classmates and how much more I could learn if I took the same classes now. These lost lessons spur me to dig a little into the lives of as many classmates as will allow. To think that his locker was next to mine for an entire school year, and I knew nothing of what he shared in this brief about himself!
 

     Naturally, we have to begin where and when he was born, which was in Dayton, Ohio, on February 19, 1946. Rick was the second of four sons born to his parents. During his growing-up years he categorized himself as an “outdoor kid” when not in school. He hails from Longfellow Elementary School, and his favorite teacher was Ms. Gritton. His favorite subject was English, and I forgot to ask him, “So does that mean that Ms. Gritton taught English?” Hmmmmmmm.
His favorite high school teacher was Carmela Vacchiano (married name, Pragalos). Now, it stands to reason that I should have asked if that meant his favorite high school subject was biology?

     During a brief period after graduating from Colonel White, Rick was working at a part-time job as a delivery boy; one of his deliveries took him to Ms. Vacchiano’s house. He explained who he was (the kid who liked to stay after school and rewind her projector reels and clean her blackboards). She didn’t recognize him at first because he left high school at 5’8”, 145 lbs and showed up at her door as a whopping 6’3”, 230 lbs!

     Not only did Rick wash blackboards and rewind reels during high school, his major extracurricular activities included swimming and diving competitions. He also engaged in martial arts training—all the while working at Kroger’s.

     How he found time for anything else is remarkable, but Rick was incorporating private music lessons on the piano, bassoon, and saxophone. Over the last 30 years, he has not actively played any instruments, but he has recently been entertaining the prospect of picking up his saxophone again. (Good idea!)

When asked how well he did in school and how his motivation and performance affected his life, this is how he answered.

“I did not work as hard as I should have in high school. I realized when I was about 20 years old, though, that I had “soaked up”  so much at CW, I decided that it was a waste not to use the education system to reach my goals. I took that realization and became a teacher so I could identify kids who weren’t working to their potential I wanted to try to influence them to reach higher earlier.”

     In the third grade Rick knew he wanted to be a teacher. Following graduation from Colonel White, Rick’s experiences included joining the U. S. Army and being trained as a military policeman. He served a year in Vietnam (December 1965 to February 1967) in that capacity. He had the distinctive honor of providing body guard service for Bob Hope, Vic Damone, Phyllis Diller, Miss World, General Westmorland, and General Abrams—important people who each served their country within their own scopes during the war.

     Miami of Ohio was his college of choice for obtaining his teaching credentials, and he boasts of still being a loyal Redskin…NOT a Redhawk! During Rick’s teaching career, he was an English teacher, a student dean, assistant principal, and high school and middle school principal. The schools where he served were Hamilton HS, Huber Heights junior high schools, Jamestown Greeneview HS, Tipp City HS, Madison-Plains HS, Barnesville HS, Three Rivers Middle School, Zanesville HS. His goal “out of the gates” was to help kids learn, and that was his favorite part of his career. This picture shows Rick with two of his hall monitors…in the early 1960s hall monitors didn’t look quite like these:

     Rick officially retired from Teaching in 2007 after 35 years. Currently, he works an ad hoc job as a trainer and consultant for National College in Kettering, Ohio.

     A few of Rick’s formal, noteworthy awards consist of the following: Huber Heights “Teacher of the Year,” State Superintendent of Schools “School of Promise” Citation; International Martial Arts Federation Lifetime Achievement Award. He has received from his communities because he has contributed to them. He is involved with the Volunteer-Dayton Veteran’s Administration, Vandalia-Butler Sister Cities project, Vandalia-Butler Historical Society, V-B S.A.Y. Soccer, Miamisburg Historical Society, Miamisburg Parks and Recreation, Miamisburg Renovation/Renewal Committee in addition to the Rotary, Kiwanis, Vietnam Vets of America, Veterans of Foreign Wars. Whew!

     Do you remember Phillips Swimming Pool on Leo Street, Dayton? Well, that’s where Rick met his wife, Karen, of 43 years. They dated off-and-on between 1962 and 1967 when they were married. He and his wife have two daughters and three grandchildren with another on the way. One daughter is also a teacher. The other daughter is a contract administrator in Washington, D. C. No pets at the moment.

Rick with his granddaughter:

 

     Everyone (I hope) finds themselves in embarrassing moments. They are so humbling! Rick says his is “…walking right in to a women’s restroom at the airport because I was reading a book.” Then on the other hand, we have all had thrilling moments. Rick couldn’t narrow his down to one because he has two daughters. His presence at the birth of each was his most thrilling moment(s).

     His hobbies are furniture building, traveling, and he is currently restoring a 1964 Studebaker Champ pick-up truck that belonged to his mother. His favorite food—not picky--any seafood. And his favorite color is blue. If he could live anywhere, you would find Rick behind a waterfall on a South Pacific Island. Confusing at the least, he would like to go to Antarctica as a place of utmost interest! I think it is safe to say he also plays golf as indicated by this picture he sent:

Jackie: “What few words would your best friend use to describe you?”
Rick: “A patient listener who would do anything to help a friend in need.”
Tell me you wouldn’t like to go back to CWHS, meet and get to know more people like Rick! (Remember to take a look at him on the Military Hall of Fame page, too.)

George Tepping, Colonel White High School, Graduating Class of 1964

by Jackie Winkler

     Often, when I can’t find one of our classmates, I “Google” the name. I did that with George Tepping, and my jaw dropped as I made the connection between the George I found online and the George we walked the halls with at Colonel White! I rushed to check my yearbook and the likeness left no doubt, so I emailed George. Within the hour my response came, and I was so excited to see what one of our classmates had accomplished, unknown to the great majority of us.

     George agreed to an email interview, and the following presents what he has been doing all these years. His professional review introduces his current position at the Wausau Conservatory of Music in Wisconsin along with his professional training and experience spanning the years since our high school graduation. Continue reading to engage in the personal information he shared about his childhood and life!

Dr. George Tepping
- Instructional duties: Executive Director of the Conservatory and Artist/Instructor of voice
- Degrees: Bachelor of Music in vocal performance - Ohio State University; Master of Music in vocal performance - Ohio State University; Doctor of Music Arts degree in vocal performance/pedagogy - University of Iowa.; Honorary degree as Cantor - K.K. B'nai Yeshrun ( Ohio).
- Professional affiliations: National Association of Teachers of Singing, National Opera Association, and College Music Society; Master Adjudicator for the Wisconsin School Music Association,
- Performances: Sixteen years as a Spiel Tenor and tenor soloist with numerous European opera companies and American symphonies with performances of over sixty different opera and oratorio roles

 
     George was previously Executive Vice President and Operational Director of the American Institute of Musical Studies - Graz, Austria; and Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Opera for Miami University. Voice student of Herald Stark, Irma Cooper, and William Whitesides. Advanced coaching with Joan Dornemann (Metropolitan Opera), Marguerite Meyerowitz (Metropolitan Opera), Craig Rutenberg (Metropolitan Opera), David Lutz (Vienna State Opera) and Heinz Sosnitza (Essen/Frankfurt Operas).

     Tepping has served as Musical Director for the Wausau Community Theatre productions of Carousel and Fiddler on the Roof and in the spring of 1997, he served as Musical Director for the WCM/WCT combined production of Hansel and Gretel and Amahl and the Night Visitors in 2001. During the summers 1999 and 2004, he served as a jury judge for the International Meistersinger Vocal Competition in Graz, Austria. He adjudicates at many district and state festivals in addition to being a regular choral clinician. He has taught voice for over thirty-five years. He has held the position of Executive Director/voice instructor since January 1991.

Where and when were you born? "Dayton, OH; May 27, 1946"
Siblings? "One older brother, Mark, also a graduate of CWHS in 1961, I believe."
Elementary school? “Cornell Heights, Dayton.”
Favorite school subject? “Music.”

Favorite elementary teacher? “Can’t remember any names of teachers at this point of life.”

Favorite high school teacher? ”Without doubt, Carol Bright (Gillette).”

Private music lessons while growing up? What? ”Yes, piano for about eight years and drums for about 5 years.”

Indoor or outdoor kid? “Indoor during the winter and outdoor during the summer.”

When did you know you wanted to be musical? Specific discipline? “Got a taste for it being in high school choir as well as in the choir at Temple Israel in Dayton. When I went to college at Pratt Institute in New York City, I also auditioned and became a member of the New York Philharmonic Chorus and found I really enjoyed singing more than engineering courses. So, I switched majors and became a voice major; switched schools to OSU since Pratt did not offer music courses; sang in many productions in college, which convinced me that I had made the right decision.”

Did other students know that’s what you wanted to do and be? "I doubt it since I really did not have many friends in school. Hung around with cousins more than non-family.

Were you scared to stand in front of people and sing? “No, guess I did not have the sense to be scared.”

Ever forget words to a song? “No – I have been blessed with a photographic memory – I actually see the music in my mind so all I have to do is to “read it.”’

Most embarrassing moment? “Happened onstage during an opera performance in Munich. I was supposed to leave the stage via a door as someone else was entering the stage. He was not supposed to find me there. Unfortunately, the door was locked. After what seemed forever, I climbed out of a window on stage to the audience’s amusement and just managed to escape in time.”

Most thrilling moment? “Two come to mind: When I was singing as a member of the New York Philharmonic Chorus and it was at my first rehearsal. Since I was short, I was placed in the first row directly in front of Leonard Bernstein who I felt was almost a god. We were singing a piece which I had sung with the Dayton Philharmonic a year before so I knew it really from memory and was singing all of the notes perfectly. Bernstein stopped and complained to the chorus that they were terrible readers and he pointed at me and said, “Why can’t the rest of you read as well as this new kid… he has not missed a note all night?” The second moment was when I was hired to be the Cantor at Temple Israel and officiated in that capacity at the first High Holiday Service in front of about 1500 people. Just to walk out and stand there in front of all those people as well as all my relatives and to manage to pull it off without any problems was a blast.”

Married? Children? Pet(s)? “Single, no pets at present.”

Hobbies? “Sailing, computers, movies.”

Favorite food? ”Italian, unfortunately for my figure.”

The last question I asked George was, “Would you ever consider performing at our 50th year reunion? ”He answered, “If it fit into my responsibilities at the school, sure.” Start the petition!

 

 

 

Judy and Bob Grove...

Read about their trips to China!

     "Remember Judy and Bob Grove? They have always been this to me. Judy and Bob were married in their senior year and are still together and still happy. Read about Judy and her trips to China.  It is very interesting. Both Judy and Bob are Missionaries and lead a very interesting life.  Another  couple from our class who has been together a long time! Enjoy." Click here to visit their web site for those who are interested to go and read further.

 

CLICK HERE to read about their trips to China. [PDF format]

If you need to install Adobe PDF Reader Click HERE

Military Hall Of Fame

 

Click For Full Size! Milt Hanks

Well, where do I start?

     Born, Montpelier, Idaho. That’s where Butch Cassidy made his first bank robbery. We left 3 days later to return to Alaska where the family was living.

     Family arrived in the US in 1623 as indentured servants in the Plymouth Colony. Great great great grandpa fought in the revolutionary war. He received a land grant near Mansfield, Ohio in lieu of pay. Until my part of the family moved west that was home.

     My family settled in southern Idaho in 1851. My great grandmother was the first English speaking child born in southern Idaho. I am a 4th generation cattle rancher. And still maintain ranching operations in Utah, Idaho and Wyoming.

     Most famous relatives; Abraham Lincoln (mother, Nancy Hanks) Tom Hanks, actor.

     I attended Longfellow Elementary (7-8). Best friends were John Stamatakos and Larry Holloway. (Both CW grads) Greatest sports thrill at Longfellow was beating Brown in the Championship (Byron Lewis & Dick Scott, CW grads). Larry scored 12 points and I had a foul shot. We won 13-12! Fast break all the way!

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     I have wanted to be an artist at least since 6 years of age. I will always be grateful to Bing Davis and Tom Bradrick as my heroes and mentors. I did attend classes at the Dayton Art Institute. That wasn’t tough as we lived next door. There almost isn’t a day that I don’t think about those two great men and teachers. Tom’s soap box he would drag out when he wanted to vent about something or the fabulous art talent and music Bing would play during class, Miles Davis, Blues etc.

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     I remember art as fun but pretty easy for me. One of the best learning experiences of my life came when I got a B from Tom. I was VERY upset because my project for the term was better than the others. Tom told me, “yes, but it wasn’t A work for you”. Thanks Tom! Every time I approach the easel I ask myself, “is this my A work?”

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     I remember fondly doing scenery for all of the plays and musicals. Most fondly because it got me out of the other classes! Do you remember that Papa Cougar, Mr. Whitworth was at EVERYTHING! He must have never slept. Did we have a great faculty or what?

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     After CW I went to Brigham Young University. I also studied at Art Students League, NY and Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. I walked on as a punter/kicker/defensive back and also played rugby at BYU. I also served as a missionary to the Guatemalan Indians between 1965-68. I speak Spanish and Mayan. I have been back many times since. I’m currently writing a book on the Maya.

     I married a girl from Huber Heights in 1969. We have 7 wonderful children. I can now enjoy lots of grand children. The marriage ended after 38 years. We had just grown completely apart. It is not something I’m real proud of.

     I spent the next few years after college in the Air Force. I zigged when I should have zagged and they told me they didn’t want me any more. Finding few options I became the art director at BYU for a few years. A growing family forced me to look for more income. You could say I screwed my self out of being an artist. I spent the next 35 years in business. I had the good fortune of finding a friend who was a genius at acquisitions and mergers and poor enough taste to want me to keep him company. I’m not sure that my input helped, but we enjoyed true success more often than disaster. And I retired several years ago.

     After my marriage died I did the adult thing and spent the next 2 years sailing the Caribbean on my boat. I found my true calling as a reclusive boat bum. I decided I needed to be closer to the kids so I moved back to Utah last year. I live in a mining ghost town in central Utah. Eureka has about 650 residents. Slightly down from the boom days when the population was about 7500. I love it. My home/studio is the old bath house and moonshine still. Yep, the old moonshine still was hidden in the coal bin where my studio is. (Rock wall in the background of the picture) I heat it with a pot bellied stove out of a caboose. Fun stuff.

     I have always painted. Even when I was in business I kept up a small gallery following. It has been fun to paint full time again without worrying about paying the bills. I am the only one that apparently can stand my company so I remain a reclusive bum. I hope you enjoy a few of my works. I have been lucky enough to find my painting in many collections and a few museums.

     Since BYU has a cougar as a mascot, I have always been and remain a cougar at heart.

GO COUGARS!!

 
Bill with his new wife, Penny, as they were leaving for their honeymoon.
Bill (William) Wells enlisted in the U. S. Air Force in April 1966 and discharged March 1970. His area of expertise and service was as a communications specialist (Communications Center Supervisor and Cryptographic Specialist). During his enlistment, Bill spent two years at Battle Creek Michigan (a NORAD base) and one year overseas (‘68-’69) at the 1876 Tactical Air Command Ton Son Nhut, in Saigon, RVN. Bill was stationed at the 2046 Communications Squadron at Wright Patterson Air Force Base for his last year of formal military service. Following his military career, his graduate and post graduate degrees prepared him to continue his service to military men and women as a professional counselor and official mentor in helping them manage issues concerning re-entry into civilian life. (He also served the civilian community who had unique needs for functioning well in general society.)
  

Richard “Rick” Sykes

     Rick served in the U. S. Army following high school. His service included a tour of duty in Vietnam from December 1965 to February 1967. He was trained as a military policeman. His first assignment was a mission that patrolled a main road from Qui Nohn east to An Khe and Pleiku west. He was then assigned to a detachment of the 1st Air Cavalry Division looking for NVA presence. Following that, he was assigned as a body guard for Bob Hope, Vic Damone, Phyllis Diller, Miss World (India), General Westmoreland, and General Abrams. From these experiences he learned discipline, determination, sensitivity, insight into the behaviors of mankind, and what incidences motivated political changes in the U.S., as well as having learned significant, personal life lessons.

Dave Annis - 1967

     Dave served in the USAF for 12 years, including a tour of duty in Viet Nam for a year (Nov 1966-Nov 1967).

     During his twelve years' service Annis worked on the flight line and later became Crew Chief. He was stationed at Luke AFB (AZ), Lackland AFB (TX), Myrtle Beach AFB (SC), Soesterberg AFB (Holland), Pease AFB (NH), Bitburg AFB (Germany), and George AFB (CA). He was married to Jackie Winkler at the time, and they had three children. He is now remarried.

RC (Bob) Veninga


     I BEGAN WORK AT McCALL'S CORP. ON JUNE 5 th , 1964 , JUST A FEW DAYS AFTER OUR COMMENCEMENT. SOMETIME IN JANUARY 1968 (THE EXACT DATE ESCAPES ME NOW) I RECEIVED AN INVITATION FROM UNCLE SAM, TO BE HIS VALENTINE. I WAS DRAFTED INTO THE ARMY FEB. 14, 1968.

     WHEN WE GOT DOWN TO THE CINCINNATI INDUCTION CENTER , WE WERE TOLD TO "LINE UP & COUNT OFF BY FOURS". I WAS A NUMBER THREE. THEN THEY TOLD ALL NUMBER FOURS TO "TAKE ONE STEP FORWARD" & SAID, "CONGRATULATIONS YOU ARE NOW UNITED STATES MARINES" !! WHEW !!! IMAGINE I WAS ONE NUMBER FROM BEING A �JARHEAD'. HA ! HA! (A LITTLE INTER-SERVICE HUMOR THERE !)

     WE WERE SENT TO FORT BENNING , GA. FOR BASIC TRAINING AT THE SAND HILL TRAINING CAMP. THE SAND HILL COMPLEX HAD NOT AT THAT TIME, BEEN USED SINCE THE KOREAN WAR. THE PLATOON STYLE BARRACKS WERE COAL HEATED. IMAGINE HAVING TO FACE WHITE GLOVE INSPECTIONS WITH ALL THAT COAL DUST ALL OVER EVERYTHING. I TURNED 22 IN BASIC & WAS LITTERALY THE �OLD MAN' OF THE COMPANY. EVEN THOUGH I LOST 5-DAYS OF BASIC WHILE HOSPITALIZED WITH PNUEMONIA, I MANAGED TO GRADUATE WITH MY CYCLE & WE BY VIRTUE OF OUR P.T.SCORES AND I.Q.TESTING WERE HONOR COMPANY AND LED THE BATTALION ON THE GRADUATON PARADE DAY.

     AFTER BASIC I AND SOME OF MY OTHER CYCLE MATES WERE SENT DIRECTLY TO FORT ORD , CA. FOR ADVANCED TRAINING. (IN OUR CASE INFANTRY TRAINING.) BY NOW, I WAS PRETTY MUCH CONVINCED I WAS VIET NAM BOUND UNLESS; I COULD SCORE HIGH ENOUGH ON TESTING TO CREATE ANOTHER OUTCOME. A LOT OF COLONEL WHITE TEACHERS WOULD BE PROUD TO KNOW, THAT EVEN THOUGH MY GRADES DIDN'T REFLECT IT, WHAT THEY TAUGHT SUNK IN! MY PLATOON AND WHOLE COMPANY WAS HONOR COMPANY OF OUR GRADUATING TRANINING BRIGADE & WE MARCHED IN THE FRONT OF THE GRADUATION PARADE AGAIN AT FORT ORD.

     MY SCORES WERE HIGH ENOUGH THAT THEY KEPT PUSHING ME TO GO TO O.C.S. ( OFFICERS CANDIDATE SCHOOL ). I SAID "OK AS LONG AS I STILL GET OUT IN 2- YEARS". THERE WAS EVEN TALK ABOUT GETTING TONY HALL (I BELIEVE HE WAS OUR CONGRESSMAN AT THAT TIME) TO NOMINATE ME FOR WEST POINT, BUT I NIXED THAT TOO, BECAUSE IT MEANT STAYING IN FOR 4 YEARS ACTIVE DUTY ALSO.

     SO�.. THEY DID THE NEXT BEST THING THEY COULD DO FOR ME AND SENT ME TO FT. MYER , VA. HOME OF "THE OLD GUARD" 3rd INFANTRY 1st BATTALION. IN CASE YOU HAVEN'T HEARD OF IT (I HADN'T), IT SURROUNDS ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY (NORTH POST ON ONE SIDE � SOUTH POST ON THE OTHER). "THE OLD GUARD" IS THE PRESIDENTIAL GUARD FOR OUR NATIONS CAPITOL. WHILE IN "THE OLD GUARD" I PERFORMED AS PART OF THE �WORLD WAR ONE DRILL TEAM' EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT AT THE JEFFERSON (MY OLD GRADE SCHOOL 7-th & 8-th GRADES) MEMORIAL. OTHER MEMORABLE EVENTS I WAS INVOLVED IN WERE �TORCHLIGHT TATTOO' AT THE FT. MYER GYM, EISENHOWERS FUNERAL (CORDON), GENERAL WESTMORELANDS RETIREMENT PARADE, NIXONS INAUGURATION (REAR GUARD), AND MANY LESSER PARADES AND EVENTS AT ARLINGTON CEMETERY TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION.

     DURING THE WAR & RACE RIOTS OF 1969 I WAS ONE OF ONLY 3 MACHINE GUN TEAMS SENT TO BE EMBEDDED AROUND THE WHITE HOUSE FOR INTERNAL PROTECTION. WE WERE TRAINED SPECIFICALLY FOR FIRING THE M-60 MCHINE GUN UNDER THE ARM ON THE RUN ALA 'RAMBO' STYLE. THE WHOLE WHITE HOUSE WAS SURROUNDED BY D.C. CITY BUSES PARKED BUMPER TO BUMPER WITH D.C. RIOT POLICE INSIDE OF THAT. ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE BUSES WERE MARINES FROM QUANTICO , VA. AND LINE TROOPS FROM "THE OLD GUARD" IN FULL RIOT GEAR. NEEDLESS TO SAY THOSE WERE SOME OF THE HARDEST DAYS OUR NATION FACED, UNTIL' 9-11'.

     WHEN IT CAME TIME FOR ME TO BE RELEASED FROM ACTIVE DUTY IN FEB.1970, TO CLEAR POST, YOU HAD TO HAVE YOUR PAPERS SIGNED BY NUMEROUS PEOPLE AND ARMY DEPTS. SO��.. WHEN IT CAME TIME FOR ME TO SEE THE RE-ENLISTMENT NCO, HE SAID "BOB I KNOW HOW YOU FEEL ABOUT THIS MAN'S ARMY BUT, I HAVE TO ASK YOU AS A FORMALITY. HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT RE-ENLISTMENT?" AND SO I SAID "YEAH SARGE, I THOUGHT ABOUT IT, LAUGHED ABOUT IT, & FORGOT ABOUT IT !! " (TRUE STORY)! BACK THEN AS AN E-4 I WAS ONLY GROSSING $220 A MONTH & COULD BRING HOME THAT MUCH ON MY JOB BACK HOME PER WEEK. BUT�..WITH HINDSIGHT BEING 20-20 I CAN SEE HOW FOOLISH I WAS TO PASS UP OPPORTUNITY KNOCKING ON MY DOOR. IF I HAD STAYED IN I COULD HAVE RETIRED IN 1988 WITH 20 YEARS OR WITH FULL BENEFITS IN 1998 WITH 30 YEARS.


Jack H. Bader

     This is a picture of me on the left and my brother Michael on the right celebrating Octoberfest in Munich Germany October 2001.

     I joined the Navy Reserve on my 17th birthday 10 FEB 1963 . A recruiter that came to Colonel White recruited me. I drilled every Tuesday night at the reserve center on Gettysburg  Avenue .

     I went to boot camp at Great Lakes , Ill from June until September 1963. I got home just in time for school. They were taking senior pictures alphabetically so I was towards the front of the list. My mother talked to someone and got him or her to put me at the end of the list to give my hair time to grow out a little bit.

     I was stationed at Patuxent River Naval Air Station from 1968 until 1970 as a 3rd class electronics technician.

     I was the Officer Recruiting Officer for Atlanta , Columbus and Macon , Georgia and Chattanooga , Tennessee from 1986 until 1988.

     I was stationed at Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) in Washington , DC from 1998 until 2002. I came back to active duty to work on the Y2K problem with the Navy's computers on board ships and planes. I was awarded the NAVY AND MARINE CORPS COMMENDATION MEDAL for my work on the NAVSEA Y2K Project from 30 NOV 98 to 30 MAR 00 .

     I retired in 2004 as a Lieutenant Commander after 26 years in the Navy Reserve.

See obituary for Jack Bader on our "In Memoriam" page.


Jim Ashby

     I served in the US Army from Aug 65 to Aug 69.  I served 18 months in Vietnam as a company clerk, Cam Rahn Bay, Da Nang, and Phan Rang. I came home in 67 and was station in Fort Polk LA as an Specialist 5th class (E-5).


Ben Holeman

US NAVY 1967 - 1971
Aerographers Mate 2nd Class
1968 - 1970 Guam/Vietnam -- VW1 Squadron (Typhoon Trackers
1970 - 1971 Fleet Weather Facility, Suitland , MD


Connie Patton

US Navy 1965-1967
Recruit Training Instructor Bainbridge, Maryland (Drill Sgt) to anyone else not in Navy; Yeoman 4th Class Third Naval District, New York, NY; Staff of Admiral John McCain; U.S Naval Representative to the U.N. father of Senator John McCain who was a POW when I served under Admiral McCain.


Jim Spires

July 29 1965 - July 31 1986
AF Msgt Retired
Medical Corpman, Cardiopulmonary Lab Technician.  I retired from Wright-Patterson AFB 31 July 1986.


Daryl Shank

I was drafted into the Army in March of 1969. This was soon after I graduated from Ohio State University with a degree in microbiology in the spring of 1968 and married my wife Sue the same month. The notice for my induction physical was in the mail box when we got back from our honeymoon.

     I entered graduate school that fall but Uncle Sam's paper work caught up with me in March of 1969. I was shipped off to Fort Dix New Jersey for training where it was decided for me that I should be in the infantry. (During the Vietnam era there was always a need for more cannon fodder.) After completing training and by a quirk of fate I was assigned to Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland . There I assisted a psychology research group which was studying biological and medical aspects of stress on monkeys and on groups of human volunteers. This also involved cleaning a lot of monkey cages! From ihere I was shipped overseas to Korea where I was assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division which was guarding a section of the DMZ. By another quirk of fate I ended up serving the rest of my tour of duty in the 2nd Medical Battalion at Camp Irwin . For you M*A*S*H aficionados this was the "battalion aid station" Radar refers to in the TV series. We were just a few miles (as the helicopter flies) from the 44th Surgical Hospital on which the MASH 4077th was based. (It was no longer mobile) There I worked in the clinical laboratory performing lab tests on the troops coming in on "sick call" from the DMZ units. Being a peace time occupying force the biggest medical threat for the troops was VD (gonorrhea and syphilis). There was also a 20-bed ward for the patients who were really sick. This proved to be a valuable experience for me. After completing my 2-year obligation to Uncle Sam, I returned to graduate school, earned my Masters degree in microbiology and spent the next several years working in clinical hospital laboratories.

Paul Logan

I served in the US Navy from 1965 to 1968. Spent one year at the Printing and Publications Center at the Naval Air Test Facility in Patuxent River Maryland and two years in charge of the print shop on board the aircraft carrier USS Randolph (CVS 15). Married my wife (Nancy Weaver) also a 64 graduate of CW and had our first son while stationed at Norfolk, Virginia.

 

 

 

 


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